Insulin Resistance and Mental State

Insulin Resistance and Mental State

Insulin resistance is a metabolic disorder characterized by an inadequate response of tissues to insulin. This can lead to type 2 diabetes, heart disease and other serious health problems. It turns out that insulin resistance can also affect mental health.
There are studies that suggest that insulin resistance can lead to increased concentrations of cortisol, a stress hormone, which can contribute to the development of depression (3). Results from a study of over 4,000 adults, those with insulin resistance were more likely to develop depression than those with insulin sensitivity (1). These results suggest that metabolic disorders may affect brain function and neurotransmitter processes.
Other studies have also found a link between insulin resistance and mood disorders such as bipolar disorder and schizophrenia (2).
There are also studies that suggest that insulin resistance can affect brain function. One study showed that patients with insulin resistance had changes in brain structure, including a reduction in hippocampus volume, which may affect cognitive and emotional function (4).
These findings suggest that insulin resistance may have adverse effects on mental health. However, more research is needed to understand the full extent of the effects of insulin resistance on brain function and mental health.

 
Source:
1. Timonen M, Laakso M, Jokelainen J, Rajala U, Meyer-Rochow VB, Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi S. Insulin resistance and depression: cross sectional study. BMJ. 2005;330(7504):17-18.
2. McElroy SL, Kotwal R, Malhotra S, Nelson EB, Keck PE, Nemeroff CB. Are mood disorders and obesity related? A review for the mental health professional. J Clin Psychiatry. 2004;65(5):634-651.
3. Rasgon NL, McEwen BS. Insulin resistance-a missing link no more. Mol Psychiatry. 2016;21(12):1648-1652.
4. Willette AA, Bendlin BB, McLaren DG, et al. Association of insulin resistance with cerebral glucose uptake in late middle-aged adults at risk for Alzheimer disease. JAMA Neurol. 2015